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About Edison T. Crux


Edison T. Crux is an urban fantasy author, blog writer, coffee addict, loving husband, and proud father. He currently lives with his family in Beloit, WI. You can find out more about his books here.

From a young age Edison has been fascinated by books and the supernatural—especially the combination of the two. From the early seeds planted by Goosebumps books, to epic magical adventures with Harry Potter, to plotting his own books while pacing the local cemetery, Edison has always had an interest in the strange and spooky.

Edison's current book series, the Enoc Tales, was inspired by the local legend of the "Beast of Bray Road" in Elkhorn. When he learned that Wisconsin had its own monster sightings similar to Bigfoot or the Jersey Devil, Edison began planning his first trip to the nearby city to see for himself. Although he never saw a beast during his many trips down Bray Road, his adventures there shaped his first book, Tale of the Wisconsin Werewolf. That story was fictional, but every encounter in the book came from a passion for the real sightings around Elkhorn.

That love of the supernatural and local legends translates beyond Edison's home state, however. As a self-proclaimed vampire nerd, Edison took a unique approach to that myth when writing Tale of the Twin-City Vampires. By drawing from classic vampire literature and real-world occult theories, Edison created a vampire story that was both original and faithful to the source material. That same approach was used to turn Polynesian mythology into a modern fairytale in Tale of the Hawaiian Night-Marchers. And in Tale of the Mothman's Return, Edison combines the Point Pleasant cryptid with a truly original UFO and alien abduction story.

All of these books have taken place in the same world, but with a different cast of characters. Right now Edison is frantically working on the book he's been planning since the beginning—Tale of the American Immortal. This book will bring the whole cast together for a massive story, in a similar fashion to the Avengers. It will be coming later 2019.

When not writing, Edison spends much of his time playing with his two sons, Matthew and Alex. As a father Edison focuses on instilling important values in his children, such as showing them how great games such as The Legend of Zelda, Minecraft, and Pokemon are. He also spends a good deal of time pacing around his patient wife, Katie, who nods sagely to whatever Edison is rambling about that day.

Edison is most active on Twitter @EdisonTCrux, although you can also follow his author page on Facebook.

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